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Parenting a Child with ADD, ADHD or Asperger’s Syndrome May 24, 2007

Posted by edukfun in add, add parents, adhd, aspergers, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, challenged, children, concentration, education, focus, general, ld, learning disability, parenting, parents, social skills, Sparks of Genius.
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Hey there everyone!

It’s Ellen again. As I muddle through my full, often exciting and stressful days, I think of  various subjects to write about that would have a positive impact on the lives of others. These subjects are usually ones which I personally have dealt with and I feel would be of significant value to discuss with all of you.

OK….here goes! Many of you are the parents of children or young adults that have a disability such as ADD or ADHD. They are really bright and intuitive, yet their disabilities make many tasks so very tough. Many in the general population believe that in order to have “a disability” one needs to have physical or facial attributes of such. We know that is not the case. But, this is what makes their lives so tough.

I know it hurts Wes, as well, he just doesn’t show his emotions–another characteristic of Asperger’s Syndrome.

My son has Asperger’s Syndrome and ADHD, as well. He is an extremely handsome, well built 26 year old young man. To look at him walking down the street one would have no notion that his Asperger’s Syndrome & ADHD make life so very difficult for him. Due to this fact, people expect “more” from him. They are not tolerant of the fact that when they drum up a conversation he cannot look you in the eye, does not understand social cues and finds it impossible to carry on a conversation without getting frustrated and ready to move on to something else, losing focus.  They wonder, “how can this be, he looks so normal, I don’t get it”. They cannot believe that he can have a disability because he “doesn’t look it”. They expect more from him and the lack of patience hurts me so very much. I know it hurts Wes, as well, he just doesn’t show his emotions–another characteristic of Asperger’s Syndrome.

A unique characteristic of AS and certain levels of autism on the spectrum, is the amazing ability to focus on one particular subject or art and truly excel in it.

Yet, also a unique characteristic of AS and certain levels of autism on the spectrum, is the amazing ability to focus on one particular subject or art and truly excel in it. Case in point, Wes reads sports statistics books daily. He is knowledgeable about just about every sport, such as, hockey, baseball, football, basketball, just to name a few. He knows information on every player, every team and if you were to carry on a conversation with him you would have no idea he has Asperger’s Syndrome (mild autism). In addition, many of the sports figures who live close by know Wes and respect him for the wonderful, kind person he is and enjoy carrying on conversations with him on his extensive knowledge of sports!

This is why we must educate society. A person can have a disability and not have to “look it”. Likewise, a person can have a disability, have physical and facial attributes of such, and society does not give that person a chance. Their IQ may be “off the charts” fabulous….but due to their “look”, the thought is “how can they achieve anything great if they have special needs.”

It is up to us to give our kids the positive reinforcement they need to continue being the creative, capable people we know they are!

I suppose you have to really get to know these people to experience what I live with on a daily basis. Not only with Wes, but with all the other exciting, phenomenal children and young adults I work with on a daily basis. How amazing, capable, talented, special and unique they are. I suppose the moral of this story would be, “Hey guys, Don’t judge a book by its cover!” Let’s take the time to advocate for our kids and teach society that they are worthwhile productive children and young adults that may very well be our future leaders. Everyone is important, they just need to be reminded of that. And, it is up to us to give our kids the positive reinforcement they need to continue being the creative, capable people we know they are!

Let’s shout it out….Let’s educate those that just don’t know what we know…..

THESE PEOPLE ARE PRODUCTIVE AND RESPECTED MEMBERS OF SOCIETY, THEY NEED TO BE GIVEN A CHANCE…..WHAT WINNERS YOU WILL SEE!

LET THOSE “SPARKS OF GENIUS” CONTINUE TO ENLIGHTEN US AS WE APPRECIATE AND MUDDLE THROUGH OUR BUSY LIVES. EVERYDAY IS A NEW EXPERIENCE, EVERYDAY IS A GIFT FROM “THE MAN UPSTAIRS.”

All the best & G—D Bless,

ELLEN

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Comments»

1. jennifer - March 25, 2010

i know what you mean my son is 20, tall strong and handsome extreemly entertaining and very good at tricking which is a form of gymnastics and martial arts, he’s beautiful to watch, also he has an intuitive grasp of the working of computers and has taught himslf how to play guitar, he plays very well and only uses 4 strings. amazing . it was very hard for him at school because he looks so good and even though i worked very close with his school the teachers still found it dificult to believe the things he just didn’t get ethan has adhd and aspergers . he has been my greatest teacher and not only am i very very proud of him , i look up to him too. he is the most amazing person in the whole world.

2. cristina - December 13, 2011

My ten yr old son has ADHD and LD. He’s a sensitive boy full of compassion and curiosity.I feel he’s a brilliant child! He loves to draw comics, play nintendo ds, make up jokes and play cards. He also loves magic tricks, wizards and Harry Potter books. He struggles in school but he’s very determined and is passing his classes with b’s and c’s. To me they are all A’s because school is so difficult for him. I’m so proud of him!! Luckily I live in a small community that is so patient and loving with him. I feel truly blessed that he’s able to go to regular school. I feel routine, patience and family support is essential for these children to thrive.


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